Meet the hooded warbler, whose bright gold face is framed by an equally recognizable jet black hood

A hooded warbler

The remainder of his yellow physique stands out even more against a startling jet black hood and bib that frames a bright yellow face.

The bird known as the hooded warbler (Setophaga citrina) is indigenous to the New World.

A little bird that is 5.1 inches long and weighs between 0.32 and 0.42 ounces.

Males have basic olive/green-brown backs and yellow underparts, and their distinctive black hoods that cover their yellow faces complete their appearance.

His face of glowing gold is framed by an equally distinctive jet black hood – meet the hooded warbler

The woman is dressed in an olive-green headpiece that stops short of her brow. Her cap, however, shields her throat and ears.

Eastern North America, encompassing the eastern United States and southern Canada, is home to hooded warbler breeding populations.

They migrate and spend the winter in the West Indies and Central America.

His face of glowing gold is framed by an equally distinctive jet black hood – meet the hooded warbler

Hooded warblers tend to live in thick lower levels of vegetation and breed all over the eastern Nearctic in temperate and subtropical zones, primarily in lowland woodlands or scrub.

Most of the time, these birds feed on tiny insects, spiders, and other arthropods that they catch in flight or pluck off plants.

His face of glowing gold is framed by an equally distinctive jet black hood – meet the hooded warbler

Both sexes sing during the mating season to entice potential partners.

The female then uses bark and other plant materials to build a nest in the underbrush of a low-lying area.

The outer layer of decomposing leaves covering the nest contains three to five eggs.

Despite the fact that it appears as though their population is growing, hooded warblers do not nearing the Vulnerable threshold according to IUCN guidelines.

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